Vince Wilfork’s son charged with stealing $300,000 of dad’s jewelry, including New England Patriots Super Bowl rings


The son of former NFL defensive lineman Vince Wilfork was arrested last month and charged with stealing more than $300,000 of his father’s jewelry, including two New England Patriots Super Bowl championship rings, according to a police complaint released by the Galveston (Texas) County District Attorney’s Office.

Police allege that Wilfork’s son, D’Aundre Holmes-Wilfork, 23, sold the rings and other jewelry after stealing them.

Wilfork, who played for the Patriots from 2004 to 2014 before finishing his career with the Houston Texans from 2015 to 2016, had contacted police on May 10. He said his two Super Bowl rings were missing, along with two AFC championship rings, and a 2001 Miami Hurricanes national championship ring, among other items including necklaces, bracelets and earrings.

Holmes-Wilfork was arrested May 22.

According to the police complaint, Wilfork told authorities that he did not report the jewelry missing or stolen immediately because he was unsure if it was packed in storage. On May 10, he said he received an email from a lifelong Patriots fan informing him of a post in a memorabilia group saying that his Super Bowl rings were for sale, which led to the filing of a police report.

Police made contact with the individual who posted the rings on the memorabilia group. The individual told police he purchased them from Wilfork’s son for $62,000 in 2020. The rings have since been turned over to police, according to the complaint.

Police also discovered that eight other pieces of Wilfork’s jewelry were sold in March of 2020, for $4,600.

Wilfork, 39, is considered one of the greatest defensive linemen in Patriots history. He was the team’s first-round draft choice in 2004, and also was recognized for his off-field philanthropy in 2010 when he was presented the team’s prestigious community service award. Wilfork, who lost his father to diabetes, raised hundreds and thousands of dollars for diabetes-related causes, and was also a strong supporter of charities that promote education and health for children.



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